matt

James Rosenquist 1933 – Present

Born in 1933 at Grand Forks, North Dakota. His family moved to Minneapolis in 1944. In 1948 he began his studies of art at the Minneapolis Art Institute. In 1953 he continued his studies of painting at the University of Minnesota. In 1955 he had a scholarship to go to the Art Students’ League, New York, where he met Robert Indiana . During this period he painted small format abstract paintings and worked part-time as a driver. In 1957 he met Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. In 1959 he was at the same drawing class as Claes Oldenburg and was made “head painter” by the Artcraft Strauss Corporation. He married the textile designer Mary Lou Adams. During the election he produced the picture President Elect in which John F. Kennedy’s face is combined in a kind of collage with sex and automobile imagery. His first one-man exhibition in the Green Gallery, in 1962, was sold out. In 1963 he worked on several sculptures, had a number of exhibitions at the Galerie Ileana Sonnabend, showed his work at the Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles, and taught at Yale University. In 1965 he began to work with lithographs. In the same year he made the 26 meter-wide picture F-111, which was shown at the Jewish Museum, New York, at Moderna Museet, Stockholm, and in other European cities. It is one of his most important works. The spatial organization of the composition into layers suggests the interrelationship of contemporary historical symbols and signs of affluence and military hardware, a vision of American culture expressing the proximity of euphoria and catastrophe. In 1967 he moved to East Hampton. In 1968 he was given his first retrospective by the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. In 1969 he turned his attention to experimenting with film techniques. In 1970 he went to Cologne for the opening of his exhibition at the Galerie Rolf Ricke. During the public protest against the Vietnam War he was briefly detained in Washington. During the same year he had comprehensive retrospectives at the Wallraf-Richards Museum, Cologne, and the Whitney Museum, New York. In 1974 and 1975 he lobbied the senate on the legal rights of artists. He became separated from his wife and designed his own house with an open-air studio at Indian Bay, Aripeka, Florida. In 1978 F-111 was exhibited in the International Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. In his work of the late seventies and eighties, e.g. 4 New Clear Women, images of women are confronted with machine aesthetics, usually in large oblong compositions. The themes of these dynamic compositions also include fire, progress and war machinery which he shows in rotating pictorial narratives. Between 1985 and 1987 Rosenquist’s entire development as an artist was shown in a comprehensive retrospective at six American museums.

Petra, Jordan

The giant red mountains and vast mausoleums of a departed race have nothing in common with modern civilization, and ask nothing of it except to be appreciated at their true value – as one of the greatest wonders ever wrought by Nature and Man.

Although much has been written about Petra, nothing really prepares you for this amazing place. It has to be seen to be believed. 

Petra, the world wonder, is without a doubt Jordan’s most valuable treasure and greatest tourist attraction. It is a vast, unique city, carved into the sheer rock face by the Nabataeans, an industrious Arab people who settled here more than 2000 years ago, turning it into an important junction for the silk, spice and other trade routes that linked China, India and southern Arabia with Egypt, Syria, Greece and Rome.

Entrance to the city is through the Siq, a narrow gorge, over 1km in length, which is flanked on either side by soaring, 80m high cliffs. Just walking through the Siq is an experience in itself. The colours and formations of the rocks are dazzling. As you reach the end of the Siq you will catch your first glimpse of Al-Khazneh (Treasury).

This is an awe-inspiring experience. A massive façade, 30m wide and 43m high, carved out of the sheer, dusky pink rock-face and dwarfing everything around it. It was carved in the early 1st century as the tomb of an important Nabataean king and represents the engineering genius of these ancient people.

“Petra” by Dean Burgen


oakstreet bootmakers……..

LEGACY

The son of a cobbler, Oak Street Bootmakers founder and designer George Vlagos apprenticed at his father’s shop where he learned the craft of shoemaking from an early age. Today, George seeks to preserve the heritage of fine shoemaking through thoughtfully designed and attentively crafted shoes.

CRAFTSMANSHIP

All Oak Street shoes and boots are handcrafted in the USA by shoemakers with over 20 years of experience. The highest standards of production are employed to yield shoes that are as durable as they are comfortable. Each pair makes use of replaceable outsoles, a feature normally reserved for formal footwear, to ensure a lifetime of wear.

QUALITY

Oak Street shoes and boots are constructed from renowned Horween Chromexcel leather. Chromexcel undergoes 89 separate processes taking 28 days and utilizing all five floors of the Horween facility in Chicago. Over the past 100 years very little has changed in the formula. Food-grade beef tallow, cosmetic-grade beeswax, marine oil, chrome salts, tree bark extracts and naturally occurring pigments are combined. The mixture is then applied using heat, steam pressure, the hands of craftsman and time. This ultimately yields the soft, supple and durable leather that is used for your shoes or boots.

Meet: Douglas Wilson

My name is Douglas Wilson. Most people call me Doug.
No, I am not any of these Doug Wilsons. Sorry.  
I am a multi-disciplinary graphic designer, photographer, art director, & university instructor who does a whole lot of letterpress printing. 
I am inspired by most everything I see and I love anything that is tactile – from paper to paint, photographs to plants. 
I love being around people that are passionate about something – I don’t care what it is, as long as they are passionate about it.
I am married to a wonderful wife that allows me to indulge in my passion of letterpress although she knows it will force us out of house and home.
I have been blessed to visit 26 countries on five continents as well as 48 of the 50 United States.
I am a graduate of Missouri State University where I received my BFA in Graphic Design and a minor in Art History.
I keep myself busy working at a advertising agency, teaching, freelancing, collecting mid-century illustrated children’s books, and planning ways to get to my two missing continents.


AA 3030

Aaron Arendt is a film maker, sculptor, graphic wizard, surfer and all around awesome guy!  We spent our college years together at The Art Academy of Cincinnati making art, drinking beer, and taming the post apocalyptic master! (inside joke) Check out Aaron and his amazing wife Mary’s website here.  Their latest film The Diamonds of Metro Valley is making the independent circuit now!

Kensington: Graffiti to Be Removed from Shepard Fairey Mural

By John Paul Titlow

When Lauren Cassady first saw the photos on Facebook, she was infuriated.  A friend of hers from the East Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia had posted pictures of the side of a building with a large graffiti tag containing the word “Spain.”

Cassady removes graffiti from the mural with special solvents.

Cassady removes graffiti from the mural with special solvents.

Graffiti on a brick wall is not that unusual in Philadelphia, but for residents of the neighborhood, this tag was particularly irksome.  It was made on a mural by Shepard Fairey, the world-renowned street artist most famous for creating the iconic “hope” poster of then-presidential candidate Barack Obama.

Fairey and a team of artists came to Philadelphia on April 23, 2010, and produced three murals, of which this was one. In mid-January of this year, residents noticed that the mural had been defaced with the large black and white tag.

After seeing photos of the tagged mural, Cassady, a professional art conservator, volunteered to come to the corner of Frankford Avenue and Norris Street two days per week to remove the graffiti.

To remove the spray paint and marker used to make the graffiti, Cassady sits on a bucket in front of the mural, slowly dabbing the tagged portion of it with a solvent-soaked Q-Tip.

Cassady dabs at the spray paint with a Q-Tip.

Cassady dabs at the spray paint with a Q-Tip.

“It’s a very slow process,” said Cassady. “You can’t use a lot of solvent at a time, or else you will harm the original work.”

She won’t be able to remove the tag completely, but hopes to get the mural as close to its original state as possible.

Cassady isn’t being paid to restore the mural, but rather volunteered to do it for her portfolio and because she genuinely enjoys restoring artwork, however tedious it might seem.

“It’s pure zen to me,” she said. “I just love it.”